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Finding your inner entrepreneur

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My favourite definition of ‘entrepreneurship’ is “the creation or extraction of value”. Simple, right?

It means wherever you are, if you are creating extra value for yourself or bringing out more worth in whatever you do, then you’re entrepreneuring! …if that’s a word. It means an entrepreneur need not only be those that start/have a business or a side hustle. By this definition, you might have countless ways and opportunities to be an astounding entrepreneur in your everyday life and not even know it.

Value comes from an idea becoming a business

When you get a great idea, it has all the potential in the world, and all the risk in the world too. These kind of cancel each other out. We tend to put too much value on just ideas and that’s the wrong approach because an idea is just the start, just the first and arguably the least of many hurdles to overcome until you milk actual value from said idea.

I don’t react the same way I used to when I chance on a great idea. Because a great idea is as valuable as no idea if nobody does something good with it. In fact, badly executing a good idea might cost you more than having no idea at all. A good idea might mean something, to someone, somewhere, but until the right idea is paired with the right person and the right systems, it means absolutely nothing.

Some people sit on an idea for decades, imagining the virtual value of the imaginary billions of dollars they will make when their idea takes off. An idea is nothing until it becomes a profitable, worthwhile endeavour that lives and breathes OUTSIDE OF YOUR HEAD. It is important that a good entrepreneur understands that the sky is the limit when a good idea takes off properly, and hell is the bottom if that idea should fail and fall when badly executed.

Nonetheless, it all still starts with an idea

We all at one point in time have had an idea about how to make more money, how to get more value. Don’t forget that by my favourite definition of entrepreneurship, you don’t have to leave your job and stop everything to be an entrepreneur. But from where do you start?

It starts from an idea, a great idea, a great and grounded idea, an idea you are passionate about, one that brings you satisfaction to see executed. One simple trick to getting that idea is to think of one thing that frustrates, and then think of how to solve it. Boom! Just like that you have your great idea.

I might have oversimplified it but it’s true. Some of the world’s biggest and brightest ideas have come from solving everyday problems. You don’t want to leave the house to buy stuff – shop online. There’s too much darkness around you at night– invent a lightbulb. Our very own Veronica Bucket is still proof that a great idea can still be a very simple one from our everyday lives.

3 questions about your idea

Is there really a market for your idea?

Don’t be a victim to misleading market demand. Let’s take rice for instance, simple rice. It’s a staple, it’s not hard to understand, and it’s literally everywhere, in every home. Everybody is eating it. So, if you were to import quality rice, people would buy it, right?

The answer is not an outright yes. Nonetheless, yes there is a huge demand in the current market for rice but how much of that market is truly YOURS? Misleading demands could make you think all is simply there for the taking. Without the proper business setup, you’d find everyone buying rice, but not yours.

Who can you share your journey with?

While developing your idea, it’s always best not to do it alone. Statistics show that companies that have co-founders grow a lot more faster than those that are run alone. Don’t separate yourself from the world with your trillion dollar idea. Find people you trust who can help you with your idea and guide you to focus.

Is it scalable?

To ensure your idea is easily scalable, imagine if you were doing a million times more of what you’ve started. Will you still be able to make profit after increased operational costs? A scalable business can maintain its performance levels as sales increase. Don’t be one of those people complaining to clients that you have a lot of workload so they have to understand why you’re failing them. People get that a lot with new businesses.

The current times we live in might make it easier to go global, but also easier to become obsolete. Markets are changing very fast and innovation is the word of everyday. Getting people with whom you trust to develop your idea, who share your passion for the journey, is also important to growing your business.

Running a Business

The most common notion of an entrepreneur involves running a business of some sort. If you want to run your idea as a business, then regardless of the nature of the business, you need to fundamentally understand these simple steps that complete a cycle.

→ Invest funds → Get Customers → Sell Goods/Service → Get Paid → Reinvest Funds… then the process restarts. Again, very oversimplified.

  • Inject Funds: An idea is not a business. Once you get a viable idea, you’d need to raise funds to turn that idea into a real business. A good idea for a business is one that fulfils your target customers’ exact needs.
  • Get Customers: It is important to have target customers clearly defined in your business plan. Effective business strategies should be adopted to build brand loyalty while selling your goods or service.
  • Sell Goods/Service: This is where you satisfy the customer by offering to them the goods they want or that service they need, with the hope that they’ll return for more business with you so you get more sales.
  • Get paid: Payments from the customers should ideally be enough to cover all operational costs and some extra: that extra is the profit. It is important to keep your business profitable for easy growth and expansion.
  • Reinvest funds: To keep going, payments to the company are reinvested back to cover increasing costs towards bigger sales. Growth and Expansion happens as the whole process restarts and repeat itself over and over again.
Now let the idea evolve outside your head

The moment you act on your great idea, it’s showtime! It’s no longer virtual reality. Extreme care should be taken so as not to start off on the wrong foot.

Know your peers. Don’t be looking for ideas concerning meaningful healthcare by talking to a taxi driver. He might say something smart every now and then but that’s not his field. It is important to find likeminded people in your sector that you’ll have discussions with.

Know your customers. RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH! Research a lot about the sector you are looking to get into. Remember what you read on misleading market demand earlier. Always ask yourself, ‘how much of the current market is MINE?” Don’t be too optimistic.

Prepare a business presentation. Continuously improve upon your pitch. A PowerPoint presentation presented to a friendly and frank audience will tell you if you have successfully gotten your idea across. Don’t forget, nobody is in your head; only you know what you know.

Learn to present your ideas concisely through practice.

The paranoid outlives the oblivious. Always assume you have a long way to go. After all, you just started, or you’re not there yet. The typical starter will not be able to get up after a few falls, even after one fall. So continuously remind yourself that “the paranoid outlives the oblivious”.

Trust yourself

Trust in yourself. If you don’t already have the stomach for it, business can be very intimidating. If you’re creating or extracting extra value in whatever you do, then you’re probably doing something different. Change is always difficult. Making that change permanent will require you going out of your way to do what you normally wouldn’t do. You will do things that are out of your comfort zone, and essentially re-evaluate what it means to be you to be an entrepreneur.

You also need the trust of your target market. A successful entrepreneur is trusted to deliver. Maybe you’re extracting extra value from an accounting job; you’d need to be trusted to deliver to get that promotion, or that extra work for extra pay. If run an e-commerce website, you’d need to be trusted to literally deliver on purchase orders. Some business men are not liked but trusted to be as their reputation narrates. Trust is essential to being an effective entrepreneur.

‘Entrepreneur In You’ Podcast – where you’ll find real value all year round

This year, my outlet of choice will be the ‘Entrepreneur In You’ column and podcast – audio and video. I will be sharing articles, funding offers, job opportunities, trade deals, mentorship programs, while also having conversations with famous and successful people we all know and read about. We will discuss their journey, how they got their spark, what drives their inner entrepreneur, and how they’ve been ‘creating or extracting value’ in many ways than we know. All these are in an effort to share ideas, offer real help and demonstrate life hacks that equip our audience with the proper tools needed to bring out the Entrepreneur In You.

Stay tuned!

Maxwell Ampong is an Agro-Commodities Trader and the CEO of Maxwell Investments Group. He is also the Official Business Advisor to Ghana’s General Agricultural Workers Union (GAWU) of TUC Ghana, the largest agricultural trade union in Ghana. He writes about trending and relevant economic topics, and general perspective pieces.

LinkedIn:/in/thisisthemax   Instagram:@thisisthemax   Twitter:@thisisthemax   Facebook:@thisisthemax   Website: www.maxwellinvestmentsgroup.com   Email: maxwell@maxwellinvestmentsgroup.com    Mobile: 0249993319

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Raising capital means more responsibility – don’t celebrate too soon

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You are the boss. YOU make your world go round. Your proverbial sun rises and sets where you command. The moment you allow outside money into your camp, all that changes whether you like it or not, whether you know it or not, whether you accept it or not.

Celebrating the mere raising of capital is a mistake. The keyword there is “mere”, which means ‘being nothing more than’. Capital is good. It is however a total disconnect from reality celebrating the mere raising of capital. It’s the good that the money does that’s a win.

“Kofi & Ama Enterprises gets funding from ABC Capital and doubles its revenue”.

Now THAT is the kind of headline I am talking about. The hype around just raising capital is a disconnect from reality and reality is that a lot of new challenges are going to manifest with the raising of capital. It is prudent to celebrate the conquering of those challenges rather than its commencement of them.

MANY ENTREPRENEURS FAIL UNDER PRESSURE

Most people, especially entrepreneurs, forget that when it comes to money, it’s in very few instances that people care about anything else other than the subject matter: THE MONEY. Has anyone owed you money before? When it was due, how did you feel? What did you think?

It’s already difficult raising capital, especially during a pandemic. Limited access to capital is one of the main reasons why entrepreneurs and SME’s fail. Yet, when the money comes, many do not have what it takes to stand the added pressure, or understand why the added pressure.

Raising capital adds to your responsibilities. You’re merely trading one headache for another and that’s a fact. When you’re not ready for the responsibility and it comes, that’s when it turns out to be discomforting.

Even when you think you’re ready, the path of growth is generally hard, also for successful people you look up to. The journey has always been hard for entrepreneurs. It still is. So, yes, discomfort will come. It is the recognition of that discomfort… the management of that discomfort… the mental labelling of that discomfort… the rationalisation of that discomfort that’ll make you a great entrepreneur, or not-so-great entrepreneur.

ALSO READ: Finding your inner entrepreneur

WE ALL NEED TO BE MORE PREDICTABLE

We are almost done with our company’s 5-year strategic plan. Over the next couple years, we want to be more predictable. We want to be more focussed. And most importantly, we want to be calculated. During a pandemic, predictability is credibility.

When people do not know what will happen next, they move towards constants, something they can depend on, like their faith, or a company that’s open and predictable. Research on how many more people have bought Apple shares during the pandemic. Apple feels safe, and predictable. People are scared. Everyone is having some irrational “what if” at the back of their heads.

So what do you do when everyone is scared, even the big, massive companies? We figure that breeding predictability starts with reporting and communication. We need to communicate our intentions, our plans. We need to communicate our operations when they’re happening, and retrospectively when they’re over.

You also have to be genuine, to others and to yourself. Remind yourself of who you are and who you aspire to gradually be. Life is evolution. Many people will invest in the vision but the vision bearer is always part of the package. It’s just as bad lying to yourself as it is lying to someone else. Arguably, it’s even worse.

Lastly when all is well, capital raising isn’t easy. Imagine uttering the words “trust me” during these times. That won’t work. So we need to also be honest about our strengths and be transparent about our dealings. Don’t expect much of blind trust these times.

YOUR LACK OF INFORMATION CAN COST SOMEONE MILLIONS

As I just stated, do not expect much of blind trust these times. It’s the harsh truth. I’ve been telling this guy Nii about how he uses the words “trust me” too many times when speaking with me. He’s very guarded. In response, he tells me the commonest story ever told among entrepreneurs, of how many people pass behind his back and cut him out of deals so he’s admittedly scared of sharing vital information.

The harsh reality is that at a certain age, time flies, I wake up at 4am, blink, then it’s 6pm. If I started seeing opportunities as a factor of time, I wouldn’t have babysat some ideas for too long, especially when the downside costs me nothing.

Nii’s million dollars might be the next person he talks to. But he seldom reveals anything and that makes me antsy. Because even though I know he’s a bright young man with lots of lucrative opportunities for him and I to collaborate on, his privacy can cost me a lot, literally.

That’s when Alan came to mind because one of his favourite words is “report”. I suddenly started seeing things from his side of the telescope. Without reports, even if all is fine through my side of the telescope, all he sees through his end is RISK.

WHEN YOU RAISE CAPITAL, YOUR PRIVACY IS DEAD

So understand this: when you raise capital, accept that your corporate privacy is dead. When you want to raise capital, accept that a sizeable number of good, prospective investors will need to hear every secret you have under your sleeve to make a decision, that is if you don’t want to be rationally questioned. You can nail the pitch better than anyone but without adequate information, investors will pass. It’s just the truth.

In that same line, after you raise capital, you no longer hold the only key to company information and processes. Members of the funding party, through regular reporting should get to know your supply routes, your most dependable suppliers and customers, how much money you make, how much money you spend, and many more.

I feel like reading thing can maybe flick a switch in someone’s mind before they miss out on opportunities for sensational growth.

When you’re guarded, it makes sense. It’s a rational reaction. Some information are crucial to your business’s existence and could destroy everything you’ve built if a competitor were to get their hands on it. That could be due to a number of factors. One of such factors might be that the feasibility of your business or idea has a really high dependency on one or two entities, be it staff or suppliers and should that be tempered with, everything will come tumbling down.

Nonetheless, you cannot become Jeff Bezos alone. So accept that bringing people in is necessary and work towards bringing in the right people. Because to succeed after raising capital, everything needs to be in the open and I literally just wondered while typing this sentence if that is why a lot of managers in Ghana fail. The kuluulu is too much! But that’s for another article.

Let’s move on.

WHEN YOU RAISE CAPITAL, YOU PLEDGE TO COMMIT

I’m in constant discussions with the consultant working our 5-year strategic plan. He’s good. Mr Amankwah is very good at what he does. I know he gets cross with me sometimes because he is passionate about me as I am about the business and I tend to investigate alternative ideas a bit too much for comfort, if any of my mentors will tell you.

I perpetually engage because I know that if everything works out, that document is a commitment, one that I will have to pledge to my staff, my Board and other stakeholders that I will fulfil the commitments within. If there’s any discomfort during the next few years after he’s done with his part, he’ll only do what his title says: to consult. But it will all be on me to feel the heat.

That’s exactly how raising capital is. It’s a commitment to carry a whole lot of responsibilities. It’s no time to jubilate, not yet. Different monies come with different rules and expectations. When the primary objective is just “raising money”, then that could cause a problem because after that’s done improperly, harsh realities have to be lived. Eventually the landlord will come check on his rent regardless of how cheap or expensive it is.

Think of it this way. Generally, you wouldn’t feel like your rented apartment is yours to do with as you please. Neither do you stop working on accommodation when you pay your first instalment and move in. Yes you’d smile but you’d also constantly be thinking of rent and what happens when that rent is due.

It’s natural to keep plotting to move out, rent a new apartment or build/buy a house for yourself one day. Yet not within a single one of those thoughts do you not cater for paying what you owe your current landlord first.

After you raise capital, you literally owe, both money and many more tangible and intangible stuff.

GET THE RESULTS, THEN CELEBRATE

Catch your breath if you must, but don’t stop having that start-up mentality. When you raise money, it means there’s more to do. It means your business or idea just took off and flying takes work. That work will be more feasible with the money but don’t underestimate how hard it could be. Until you literally start delivering, nothing has happened yet as far as meaningful  Get the money, then move on your plans. Only celebrate when you get the results.

‘Entrepreneur In You’ Podcast – where you’ll find real value all year round.

This year, my outlet of choice will be the ‘Entrepreneur In You’ column and podcast – audio and video. I will be sharing articles, funding offers, job opportunities, trade deals, mentorship programs, while also having conversations with famous and successful people we all know and read about. We will discuss their journey, how they got their spark, what drives their inner entrepreneur, and how they’ve been ‘creating or extracting value’ in many ways than we know. All these are in an effort to share ideas, offer real help and demonstrate life hacks that equip our audience with the proper tools needed to bring out the Entrepreneur In You.

Stay tuned!

Join me on other episodes of the ‘Entrepreneur In You’ Podcast to know more.

Author: Maxwell Ampong

Maxwell Ampong is an Agro-Commodities Trader and the CEO of Maxwell Investments Group. He is also the Official Business Advisor to Ghana’s General Agricultural Workers Union (GAWU) of TUC Ghana, the largest agricultural trade union in Ghana. He writes about trending and relevant economic topics, and general perspective pieces.

LinkedIn:/in/thisisthemax   Instagram:@thisisthemax   Twitter:@thisisthemax   Facebook:@thisisthemax   Website: www.maxwellinvestmentsgroup.com   Email: maxwell@maxwellinvestmentsgroup.com    Podcast: www.anchor.fm/einu   Mobile: 0249993319

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Boom and Bust: The rise and fall of global business empires in the Pandemic [Infograph]

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The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge influence on the economies of many countries, so much so that the current financial score of many brands now wears a new look, significantly different from what it was in the last fiscal year. The stock market seems to be running on pins and needles, with trades and businesses no longer in full swing as they used to be.

While some brands hit a new low during this period, others have been at the tailwind of the robust stock market, hitting astronomical figures in profits. To determine how well or not businesses have adjusted to the whims and caprices of the coronavirus pandemic, we have organized a study based on some industrial and retail giants.

This case study, based on fifty (50) large companies that maintained a market capitalization of over USD $10 billion before the pandemic highlights what areas of the economy were most hit, and which of these industries managed to stay afloat regardless. It also discusses whether the current state of the economy is only temporary or whether brands should prepare for a new normal.

For the purpose of this study, it is assumed that these companies started feeling the influence of the coronavirus pandemic on January 30, 2020, when the World Health Organization (WHO) announced Covid-19 as a global health emergency.

The Rise and Fall of Global Business Empires

A temporary phase? Yes? No? Whatever the case, it is difficult to ignore the fact that the modifications major commercial players are making on their business models are going to affect the world economy significantly.

Worthy of note is that most of the companies that have prospered during the pandemic have American and Chinese roots. Coincidentally, many big players in the US are also bearing the brunt of the pandemic, recording meager profits; and some of them, even losses.

In what is turning out to be a dismal year for many, certain technological giants have somehow flourished, plausibly due to the types of services and products they provide.

Even with governments imposing lockdown measures and ordering citizens to stay indoors, companies like Apple, Amazon, Facebook, PayPal, T-Mobile, and Alibaba have still managed to pull through the pandemic with ease, registering significant growth in the process, with the potential to maintain their high capitalization values even past the crisis.

According to the study, Zoom Video Communications Inc has enjoyed the largest increase in market capitalization, more than twice that of Tesla in second place. Interestingly, this number is still on the rise.

However, it remains to be seen if this trend will continue or there is a potential dip in market capitalization percentage lurking around for Zoom.[1] Eric Yuan, the CEO and founder of Zoom, has been touted as one of the best business leaders during the pandemic.

Tesla INC also received a major boost in market capitalization. A major contribution to the sudden spike was an announcement about a stock split made on August 11, 2020. Since doubling the number of shares doesn’t necessarily translate to an increase in earnings, the evolution for the next period is uncertain.

NVIDIA Corporation, Pinduoduo INC, Shopify, Meituan Dianping, and DocuSign Inc, as well as the United Parcel Service, all had a decent increase in market capitalization, and are likely to keep that score steady for a longer-term compared to others on the list.

Online shopping and deliveries became essential during the lockdown, but it remains to be seen whether people will choose to do a significant part of their shopping this way in the post-pandemic period, or simply hurry back to brick-and-mortar stores as soon as the situation allows.

Another category of companies are those without any significant rise in market capitalization, but with the potential to maintain steady numbers or grow steadily considering their well-established market presence and strong consumer base. Among them are Tencent, Netflix, Adobe Inc, Thermo Fisher, Target, Costco Wholesale Corporation, Lululemon, Qualcomm, RingCentral Inc.

As for businesses like Abbvie INC and Danaher, the public response would become a huge factor in whether the rising trajectory will continue or dip in the near future. At this point, it is hard to tell which would be the case.

Taking a look at percentage drops, it’s not so difficult to spot Occidental Petroleum Corporation with the biggest slump in market capitalization, a whopping 74% drop. The oil-producing giant is struggling to move forward, after repeatedly slashing its budget to avoid accumulating massive debts it could potentially incur due to the oil price crisis.

The Boeing Company is not left out either, placed only a few points shy off Occidental Petroleum Corporation. Between the efforts to bring back the Boeing 737 Max and the headache in solving the manufacturing issues of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner against a gloomy backdrop in the whole airliner industry this year, it’s hard to say what 2021 will bring for this aerospace and defense giant.

Exxon Mobil Corporation is also on the other end of the spectrum, showing a significant drop in market capitalization by USD. In retrospect, it’s not the company’s first severe hit, and the fact that it’s managed to bounce back indicates its resilience to possibly rebound once the current climate starts to clear away.

Numerous industrial and retail giants suffered huge drops of around 30-50% in market capitalization during the coronavirus crisis. Big corporations like EOG Resources, Wells Fargo & Co, Royal Dutch Shell (in the Netherlands), B.P. p.l.c. (in the U.K.), United Airlines Holdings Inc, American Airlines Group, Delta Air Lines, Kinder Morgan have declined by between 40 and 50%.

Others like Citigroup, Wynn Resorts, Equity Residential, Host Hotels & Resorts, Raytheon Technologies Corporation, Marriott International, Inc., Chevron Corporation, and MGM Resorts all saw a dip in their market capitalization by about 30 and 40 percent.

How A Shift in Consumer Habits Plunged Some Brands Into The Doldrums

The coronavirus pandemic was not only a health crisis but a black swan event that exposed the vulnerabilities of many companies and industries. Most of these companies were unable to cope with the shift in consumer habits, and not even clutch decisions by their management could save their faces. In one clean sweep, these industries lost a large fraction of their customers because they were unable to cater to the new needs of their customers.

This shift in consumer habits no doubt dealt a huge blow to some industries while ordering some others to the forefront of things. The response of these businesses to the change in consumer habits is what separates those that flourished in this period from those who were hit hard by the crisis.

Source: cocosign.com

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40 of the best marketing quotes for successful business marketing

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Marketing is a broad discipline that can seem quite chaotic when applying to business models. Ranging from content marketing, to social media marketing, brand reputation management, ad campaigns, and digital marketing, the discipline can seem like quite a tedious and cumbersome process.

Many small businesses and startups struggle to find the right marketing tools or strategies to grow their business and thus have an eventual fallout.
Below is a list of 40 marketing quotes by some of the world’s leading entrepreneurs and influencers that can inspire your marketing moves for business success in 2021.

1. “Build something 100 people love, not something 1 million people kind of like.” – Brian Chesky, co-founder of Airbnb
2. “It’s not what you sell that matters as much as how you sell it!” — Brian Halligan, CEO & Co-Founder, HubSpot
3. “Ignoring online marketing is like opening a business but not telling anyone.” — KB Marketing Agency
4. “Amazing things will happen when you listen to the consumer.” –Jonathan Midenhall, CMO of Airbnb
5. “Marketing’s job is never done. It’s about perpetual motion. We must continue to innovate every day.” — Beth Comstock, Former CMO & Vice Chair, GE
6. “The best marketing doesn’t feel like marketing.” — Tom Fishburne, Founder & CEO, Marketoonist
7. “Give them quality. That is the best kind of advertising.” –Milton Hershey, entrepreneur
8. “Our jobs as marketers are to understand how the customer wants to buy and help them to do so.” –Bryan Eisenberg, speaker, and online marketing pioneer
9. “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.” — Milan Kundera, Writer & Playwright
10. “Strong customer relationships drive sales, sustainability, and growth.” –Tom Cates, chairman and founder of The Brookeside Group
11. “What separates good content from great content is a willingness to take risks and push the envelope.” — Brian Halligan, CEO & Co-founder, HubSpot
12. “Quality content means content that is packed with clear utility and is brimming with inspiration, and it has relentless empathy for the audience.” — Ann Handley, CCO, MarketingProfs
13. “Content is king.” — Bill Gates, Co-Founder, Microsoft
14. “Master the topic, the message, and the delivery.” — Steve Jobs, Co-Founder, Apple
15. “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou, Civil Rights Activist & Poet
16. “People will ignore or skip anything they don’t like. So brands have to start making things they love.” — Steve Pratt, Partner, Pacific Content
17. “Brand equity is the sum of all the hearts and minds of every single person that comes into contact with your company.” — Christopher Betzter, Brand Strategist
18. “Your brand is what people say about you when you’re not in the room.” — Jeff Bezos, Founder & CEO, Amazon
19. “Your talent determines what you can do. Your motivation determines how much you are willing to do. Your attitude determines how well you do it.” — Lou Holtz, Former Football Coach, Notre Dame
20. “Good marketing makes the company look smart. Great marketing makes the customer feel smart.” — Joe Chernov, VP Marketing, Pendo.io
21. “Conversation with customers will increase sales, even if the product or service is never mentioned.” – George Farris, founder of Farris Marketing
22. “Advertising brings in customers, but word-of-mouth brings in the best customers.” –Jonah Berger, author & marketing professor
23. “Content is fire. Social media is gasoline.” –Jay Baer, author & inspirational marketing speaker
24. “You cannot buy engagement. You have to build engagement.” –Tara-Nicholle Nelson, CEO of Transformational Customer Insights
25. “Just as you don’t need to be on every single TV channel, I don’t believe a brand needs to be on every single social media in one big way.”– Shiv Singh, marketing author
26. “Social media is about the people. Not about your business. Provide for the people and the people will provide for you.” – Matt Goulart, digital marketing executive
27. “Before you create any more ‘great content,’ figure out how you are going to market it first.” –Joe Pulizzi, content marketer, and strategist
28. “Not viewing your email marketing as content is a mistake.” –Chris Baggott, CEO of Compendium
29. “Don’t build links. Build relationships.” –Rand Fishkin, founder of Moz
30. “Good content isn’t about good storytelling. It’s about telling a true story well.” Ann Handley, head of content at MarketingProfs
31. “People share, read, and generally engage more with any type of content when it’s surfaced through friends and people they know and trust.” –Malorie Lucich, head of product communications at Pinterest
32. “Good content should be at the heart of your strategy, but it is equally important to keep the display context of that content in mind as well.” –Tim Frick, principal of MightyBytes
33. “We need to accept that we won’t always make the right decisions, that we’ll screw up royally sometimes — understanding that failure is not the opposite of success, it’s part of success.” — Arianna Huffington, Founder & CEO, Thrive Global
34. “Nothing sticks in your head better than a story. Stories can express the most complicated ideas in the most digestible ways.” — Sam Balter, Sr. Marketing Manager of Podcasts, HubSpot
35. “The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller. The storyteller sets the vision, values, and agenda of an entire generation that is to come.” — Steve Jobs, Co-Founder, Apple
36. “At its very core, marketing is storytelling. The best advertising campaigns take us on an emotional journey — appealing to our wants, needs, and desires — while at the same time telling us about a product or service.” — Melinda Partin, Senior Director of Marketing & Digital Strategy, UW Medicine
37. “Social media marketing is about creating content that brings your audience together as a community and inspiring authentic conversations while increasing your brand’s awareness.” — Krystal Wu, Social Media Community Manager, HubSpot
38. “I use social media as an idea generator, trend mapper, and strategic compass for all of our online business ventures.” — Paul Barron, CEO, Foodable Network
39. “Marketers need to build digital relationships and reputation before closing a sale.” — Chris Brogan, President, Chris Brogan Media
40. “Digital marketing is not an art of selling a product. It is an art of making people buy the product that you sell.” — Hecate Strategy

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